Two waves of IS terrorists are said to have been trained for terror attacks in Europe - either for suicide bombings, or for Paris-style handgun attacks.

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• In Norwegian: - 272 IS-krigere skjuler seg i Europa. 150 nye terrorister på vei

(Dagbladet): Today, Dagbladet can reveal information about two waves of Islamic State terrorists, specially trained for attacks on European soil.

The first wave is said to already have travelled to Europe. The second wave is still with the terror group in Syria - after having received training in a militant camp between Sinjar and Mosul in Iraq. The Norwegian Police Security Service (PST) confirms to Dagbladet that they are familiar with the information.

Dagbladet has obtained the information from a source with deep insight into IS in Syria. The source has previously given information which proved to be correct.

- PST is aware that similar information exists. I do not want to go into more detail about the information PST possesses, regarding the information that Dagbladet has obtained, Trond Hugubakken, head of communications at PST, says.

The latest IS related terror attack in Europe, was the tragedy in Paris on November 13. 130 people were killed, and 351 wounded, when IS related terrorists attacked on six different places in the French capital.

- 272 in Europe

Dagbladet is told that the first wave of IS terrorists, trained for attacks in Europe, originally consisted of 300 fighters. 28 of the 300 have lost their lives in Syria - in bombings, firefights, or from other causes. Dagbladet is told that the remaining 272 fighters have travelled to Europe. The fighters are said to be instructed to lay low. Dagbladet is aware that other sources have another estimate of the number of IS terrorists in Europe. This estimate is below 100.

The second wave of terrorists consists of 150 fighters, who are still in Syria. They are said to have had training in a militant camp between Sinjar and Mosul in Iraq. 112 of the 150 have completed their training. Approximately two weeks ago several of the 112 travelled from the militant camp, to the IS controlled city of Deir el Zour in Syria. Dagbladet is told the fighters travelled to Syria using a total of 11 cars.

From Deir el Zour they travelled on to Raqqa - IS' most important city in Syria, and the «capital» of the terrorist group?s so-called «caliphate», and the neighbouring city of Tabaqah. A German IS fighter is said to be a leader in this group.

- Two types of operations

According to Dagbladet's source, the first wave of fighters was trained in Raqqa. There they were trained to perform two different types of terror attacks, Dagbladet is told.

• One group is said to be trained to become martyrs through suicide attacks. Dagbladet?s source describes these fighters as being «completely brainwashed».

• The second group is said to be trained to plan attacks using handguns and suicide belts.

Both methods were used during the Paris attacks on November 13.

PST: - Aware of the information

The Norwegian Police Security Service confirms that they were aware of the information before Dagbladet approached them.

 - Intelligence is, and will always be, uncertain. Intelligence work is for a big part about making uncertain information more certain. The stream of terror related information is vast. Some of this information is correct, lots of it is incorrect. I do not want to go into more detail about the information PST possesses, regarding the information that Dagbladet has obtained, Trond Hugubakken, head of communications at PST, says.

- The amount of information usually increases considerably related to, and in the aftermath of, terror attacks. This was also the case with the terror attacks in Paris in November. PST is continuously working to verify and analyse the information we receive, in order to supply the Norwegian authorities with the best possible foundation on which to decide how to relate to the threat situation we are facing all the time.

Dagbladet has no concrete information about possible attacks on Norwegian soil.

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